Photo Essay: Colorado River Headwaters Scenic Byway

(This long grey stretch of winter has me feeling cabin feverish and wanderlusty.  I don’t have any travel plans for the near future so I’m indulging in some adventure reminiscence.  All arm chair travelers are welcome!)

Last March, my husband and I spent some time in Colorado – Denver (for business) and Grand Lake (for pleasure).  While staying in Grand Lake, we decided to drive the Colorado River Headwaters Scenic Byway, which begins near the birthplace of the mighty Colorado River in Rocky Mountain National Park and ends at State Bridge where the river meets Rt. 131.  Although this scenic drive may not be as spectacular as some of the other Byways we experienced, I enjoyed it the most – for the remoteness, the variety of landscapes, and the abundance of wildlife. I’m sure the crisp, blue-sky, cusp of spring day helped to improve my opinion of it, too. This Byway exemplifies all the qualities that make Colorado uniquely gorgeous.

What do you think?

Colorado River Headwaters Scenic Byway

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{ View from Rt. 40 }

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{ Hot Sulphur Springs State Wildlife Area }

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{ Great place for a picnic.  Or fishing – we saw many fishermen here. }

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{ Outside of Kremmling on Grand County Rd. 1 (Trough Road) }

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{ Much of this Byway is gravel road }

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{ Gore Canyon }

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{ Large herds of mule deer were everywhere }

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{ More fishermen }

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{ One of the few vehicles we encountered on Trough Road }

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{ Heading back to Grand Lake on Rt. 40 }

Thanks for joining me.  I hope you enjoyed the tour!

 

A Brief Study in Seasonal Contrast

Yesterday afternoon, my husband and I spent several hours trimming and tidying up the yard, bushes, and flower beds.  While I worked, I had the opportunity to look closely at the remains of a luxurious growing season.  Perhaps you think there is nothing to see in a garden this time of year.  And, if you are looking for the vibrance and voluptuousness of summer, you would be right.  It is true that the plants I tucked in for a long winter’s nap were mere skeletons of their former glorious summer selves – dried out, brown, and brittle.

And yet….

These perennials displayed a spare, fragile grace that I found beautiful and moving in its own way.  So, smack in the middle of raking leaves and pulling weeds, I felt compelled to grab the camera and attempt to capture the fleeting and inherently sad loveliness I was seeing.  I’m sharing the best of the shots here along with some images from the summer.  It’s quite a contrast, don’t you agree?  Let me know what you think.

Coneflower (August)

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Coneflower (November)

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Lacecap Hydrangea (June)

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Lacecap (November)

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Tea Leaf Vibernum (September)

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Tea Leaf Vibernum (November)

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Mophead Hydrangea (June)

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Mophead Hydrangea (November)

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